pain

Acupuncture and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

by Mary Vincent, L.Ac.

Many people have been turning to acupuncture for chronic digestive issues, with especially good outcomes for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a common, chronic condition that affects the large intestine, causing uncomfortable symptoms which include:

Constipation and/or diarrhea (can alternate between both)
Bloating and gas
Abdominal pain and cramping

 

A diagnosis of IBS is given based on the presence of the above symptoms, but without bloody stools, weight loss, or inflammation so severe that it causes discernible changes in the tissue of the large intestine. If you present with the above symptoms, your doctor may run tests to rule out other diseases (e.g., stool sampling tests, blood tests, and x-rays). If something more serious is suspected, you may also undergo a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. Contrary to more serious gastrointestinal disorders, there is no increased risk of colon cancer with IBS. While the symptoms that do exist can be ongoing, they are rarely severe, though they can cause enough physical discomfort or embarrassment to interrupt one’s regular daily activities. Currently, there is no known cause of IBS, though there has been some speculation that it may be caused by incorrect signals to the bowel from the brain. It is recognized that it is common to have an IBS flare up after stressful life events or a gastrointestinal illness, and it is more common among those who suffer from anxiety or depression.

IBS typically affects people younger than 45, and is about twice as common in women as in men.

How does acupuncture help?

A great number of acupuncture points exist on areas of the body that correspond with many large nerve branches of the peripheral nervous system (the part of the nervous system that [...]

Tension Headaches

By Mary Vincent, L.Ac.
Tension headaches are the most common type of all headaches, and definitely one of the most common issues we see here at BCA. These types of headaches occur for a variety of reasons, and are often described as mild to moderate pain that includes a squeezing, throbbing, or feeling of pressure at the temples or in a band around the head. Occasionally patients will also report pain behind their eyes. These headaches almost always include tight and painful muscles at the back of the head, the base of the skull, and/or in the upper trapezius muscle (the “upper shoulders”). Women are twice as likely as men to experience tension headaches on a regular basis.

Tension headaches are broken down in to two categories: episodic and chronic. Episodic tension headaches occur less than 15 days a month, while chronic tension headaches occur more than 15 days in a month. Typically though, most people who suffer from these types of headaches tend to get them around 1-3 times a week. The most common causes of tension headaches include:
▪ Emotional/Mental Stress–This is the most obvious reason and causes many a tension headache. Difficulties at work or at home, major life changes (new job, loss of a job, a new baby, ect.), and a history of anxiety and/or depression are often the root causes of these nagging headaches.
▪ Poor Posture–this is one of the major things we see in the clinic related to tension headaches. People in professions that spend many hours working on a computer each day are probably the #1 type of person we treat with these types of reoccurring headaches, generally related to their chronic, poor daily posture while working.
▪ Poor Sleep–A [...]